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GUEST POST: HELPING YOUR CHILD OVERCOME CYBERBULLYING AT A NEW SCHOOL

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Special thanks to Laura Pearson of Edutude.net for this post about cyberbullying! 

August 10, 2017

Cyberbullying can happen to just about anyone as long as they have access to the Internet, and when it happens to a teen, parents are often at a loss as to how to help. It can be difficult to know where to begin, in part because cyber bullies often work anonymously and can strike in many different forums, from social media to texting.

Because parents want nothing more than to protect their child, it’s important to know the best ways to help when cyberbullying occurs. Many young people face these issues when they’re new to school, which can make a big move even harder to deal with. Fortunately, there are several simple ways you can help your child make good decisions when it comes to bullying and teach them how to overcome it.

Here are a few of the best ways to do just that.

Educate yourself

It’s imperative to know exactly what cyberbullying is. It can come in many forms, from stalking to using a public online forum to harass or threaten someone. Most cyber-bullies use a screen name to protect their privacy, which gives them a sense of entitlement and safety. By not allowing them to continue their bullying–by reporting it or blocking them–your child is sending a message that they will not tolerate such behavior and will not be threatened.

Keep a log of evidence

One of the most important ways you can help your child where bullying is concerned is to find a way to save all evidence of it. Take screenshots or print messages out; just be sure to get the timestamp so that it can clearly be dated, as that might prove important at a later date. This may be easier said than done, as often, cyber bullies don’t stop at one or two attacks. There may be several instances that need to be recorded.

Block the bully

All social media sites should have a way to block a particular person from seeing your posts, so have your child keep the bully from being able to contact them in any way. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Skype all have a blocking feature; if the bullying is taking place via email, you might look into having your email service send all messages from their address to one file; this way, they won’t go straight to your child’s inbox, and you’ll have a record of when they were sent and from where.

Make home a safe, comfortable place

Being the victim of a cyberbully can make a young person feel scared, helpless, lonely, and even suicidal. Make home a safe, comfortable place by allowing your child to talk openly to you about what’s going on. Give him a stress-free environment and reduce anxiety by keeping a close eye on his diet and making sure he gets enough rest and exercise. You can also help him find relaxing activities to do at home, such as playing basketball or reading.

For more tips on how to make your home a healthy place for your child or teen, read on here.

Boost your child’s self-esteem

Being the victim of bullying can weigh heavily on a child’s mind, so help boost their self-esteem by finding ways they can express themselves. Art, cooking and baking, and physical activities like sports or even gardening can all help a child feel capable and more in control of things, which is extremely important in situations like these.

Remember that it’s important for your child not to retaliate in any way towards the bully; doing so only makes things worse, and they could get in trouble for the role they play in it. Talk to your child about the best ways to move ahead and be as supportive as possible during this difficult time.

 

 

 

 

 

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Lizzie Sider – Summer Love Song | Starry Constellation Magazine

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Lizzie Sider – Summer Love Song | Starry Constellation Magazine

Interview by Jamie Sternberg / Starry Mag 

August 6, 2017

Q) You’ve accomplished a lot for being just nineteen years old! How does that feel?

A) Thank you! It feels awesome! My “teen years” have definitely been different than a lot of my friends’, but I am thankful to have had some really cool experiences this early on in life.

Q) You’re so passionate about something that’s also very close to my heart; anti-bullying. It’s inspiring for someone so young to be so active in such an important cause. Can you speak a little about this?

A) It’s such an important topic and I am glad it’s a prominent talking point in the mainstream media. While I am heartbroken at much of what I read, I think it’s imperative that we ….. [READ MORE]

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AT&T Combats Cyberbullying, Unveils ‘There’s A Soul Behind That Screen’ and Introduces #LaterHaters

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AT&T Combat Cyberbullying, Unveils ‘There’s A Soul Behind That Screen’ and Introduces #LaterHaters

AT&T is launching a new education effort to help students, parents and educators tackle the cyberbullying crisis. The effort shares valuable tools and resources and encourages parents to stay involved in their children’s online lives.

The initiative debuts in New York City and will feature a groundbreaking AT&T-produced film, ‘There’s a Soul Behind That Screen.’ ………. ”

READ MOREwatch the preview / check out #LaterHaters

 

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WHY I STAY (by David Horan)

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Truly inspired by this guy! So glad David Horan stayed. Eduction needs more teachers like him!

Here’s to a world of no dots or stars. 

Why I Stay

by David Horan | July 11, 2017

This month I found myself with a group of teachers I hadn’t met before. An easy icebreaker when meeting with other teachers is to discuss the reasons why we became teachers. There were many, often centering around wanting to make a positive impact through children on the world.

Then someone asked a profound question, one that somehow I’d never been asked. Why are you still a teacher?…….. READ MORE 

https://downrighted.wordpress.com/author/downrightdavey/

https://twitter.com/downrightdave

#YouAreSpecial https://youtu.be/15QuHygLwFU

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Lizzie Sider: Helping Kids Stand Up To Bullying Through Music (Artist Waves)

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Lizzie Sider: Helping Kids Stand Up To Bullying Through Music

And her incredible Nobody Has the Power to Ruin Your Day Foundation

By Artist Waves

July 7, 2017

Lizzie Sider, here. Writing to you from my 501c3 not for profit Foundation, “Nobody has The Power To Ruin Your Day, Inc.”

As a singer-songwriter, I am proud to have charted in the Top 40, twice, on Nashville’s prestigious Music Row Country Chart.

Having just recently turned 19, I am also proud to be known as our country’s leading teenaged Bully Prevention Activist.

I invite you to explore the below, listen to my music and to write about it and spread the word.

READ MORE … 

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Youth Voice Highlight series Part 1 – Meet Lizzie Sider (by IBPA)

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Hitting The High Notes With Empathy & Kindness

IBPA (International Bullying Prevention Association) Annual Conference

November 5-7 | Nashville, TN

by International Bullying Prevention Association

Today is Part 1 of our Youth Voice Highlight series. Meet Lizzie Sider, 19, founder of Nobody Has The Power To Ruin Your Day, Inc., who will be presenting at #IBPANash in November! Lizzie is a top 40 Nashville recording artist, who was bullied as a child, and has visited over 400 schools nationwide, engaging students about bullying, cyber bullying and how to deal with it. Sider has been featured on Fox News National TV. Her bully prevention video is in more than 3,600 schools, in all 50 states and beyond, representing over 2,400,000 children. She has presented for NC School Counselors, AASA, AFSA and NCEA, and published articles for AFSA, NASSP and National PTA.

Lizzie says, “The best tip I have for working with youth on bullying prevention, is for adults to always listen and be aware. We all learn more and become aware of more when we listen. So, engage with youth, treat them with respect and dignity, and listen and become aware of what is going on with them. Then, with that info at hand, adults can more effectively formulate a bully prevention plan for their particular situation.”

You definitely don’t want to miss Lizzie’s session on Monday, November 6!

Register for the conference here: https://www.eiseverywhere.com//ehome/222224

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POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE: MAKE IT THE PRINCIPAL (Lizzie Sider)

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As a principal, you set the bar for everyone in your school community regarding how to act, how to speak, how to regard others, and how to lead. It is your job to help everyone become the best version of themselves. A positive school culture may be only an aspiration or idea to some, but do your best to implement it in your school, and turn it from an idea into a practice. And then, principals, make it the principle. -Lizzie Sider

POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE: MAKE IT THE PRINCIPLE

By Lizzie Sider

NASSP (National Association of Secondary School Principals) Posted by Student Voice on March 15, 2017

NASSP Student Leadership Initiative | Global Citizenship – Students Changing The Word Together  March 13, 2017

Guest post by Lizzie Sider

Lizzie Sider is an 18-year-old singer/songwriter born and raised in Boca Raton, FL. She is also the founder of the bully prevention foundation Nobody Has The Power To Ruin Your Day, through which she has personally visited over 350 schools with her original bully prevention assembly. In her post below, Lizzie offers principals some observations related to the importance of promoting a positive school culture. Lizzie’s endeavor highlights key values all global change ambassadors should possess, including promoting awareness/perspectives and empathetic action.

To see what global change ambassadors are working on and to learn more about NASSP’s student leadership initiative on global citizenship, visit makingglobalchange.org.

Lizzie Sider on her national bully prevention school tour. Photo by Darryl Nobles

In elementary school, I was badly teased, excluded, and ridiculed. I would come home from school crying almost every day, feeling defeated and not wanting to return. The strength that I ultimately gained through the process of overcoming the bullying inspired me to create my first bully prevention assembly, which combined music with messages of bully prevention, positivity, and encouragement. To date, I have led this same assembly at over 350 schools and before 150,000 children nationwide. My newest project, a free bully prevention video package, launched in December 2016 and is currently being used in over 3,400 schools, reaching more than 2 million children worldwide.

My experiences with bullying and bully prevention have given me insight into the important role that principals and other school leaders have in creating a positive environment for students. Imagine walking into a school as a visitor and being greeted by the principal as a fellow educator. Now imagine performing a live, upbeat assembly with hundreds of excited children who welcome you as a peer. In this unique dual role as both educator and student, I have been able to see what is really going on beneath the surface at a school, which is represented in its culture.

According to Dr. Kent D. Peterson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, school culture is “the set of norms, values and beliefs, rituals and ceremonies, symbols, and stories that make up the ‘persona’ of the school.” A toxic school culture is detrimental and leads to intolerance and unhappiness among all students and administrators. In contrast, a healthy one is what makes a school exceptional.

Characteristics of an Exceptional School

From my observations, the principal makes all the difference in creating a positive school culture and is the one person who can make or break a school culture. Here are some characteristics of exceptional schools that I have seen and that principals should insist upon:

  • Positive and uplifting leadership. It’s the duty of the principal to be invigorated, inspired, and invested in the spirit and the demeanor of everyone in the school. Your example will set the tone for everyone else around you. Communicate well and be an example of good values and respectable behavior. The faculty and staff will notice your behavior and feel compelled to mimic it, and then the students will follow and adopt that same behavior as their own.
  • Mutual respect. Establishing mutual respect is key to opening all doors—conversation, understanding, discipline, etc.—with your teachers, counselors, students, and parents.
  • Making sure everyone feels part of a team. Acknowledge work well done and get to know those around you, because they’re your teammates. Everyone will work best together when they all feel like part of the same team.
  • Showcasing student art around the school. Encourage your teachers to engage in art activities with their classes and get those walls decorated with the students’ artwork! Seeing their own creations displayed inspires students to be more imaginative and more invested in their school community.

Making a School a Safe Space

A student-made poster at a school, with handmade butterflies and a painted quote from Lizzie’s bully prevention campaign’s theme song, “Butterfly.” Photo by Lizzie Sider

A school should be a safe space for everyone in the school and it is up to the principal to set the tone for creating that safe space. Students should feel like they can come to the principal with any problems they might have and expect a compassionate adult who is actively listening and working with them to find a solution. Principals should also encourage teachers to submit new ideas to make the school better and, overall, model what the best choices are. Show students and teachers what to do with your own behavior.

As a principal, you set the bar for everyone in your school community regarding how to act, how to speak, how to regard others, and how to lead. It is your job to help everyone become the best version of themselves. A positive school culture may be only an aspiration or idea to some, but do your best to implement it in your school, and turn it from an idea into a practice. And then, principals, make it the principle.

Lizzie Sider can be reached at lizzie@nobodyhasthepowertoruinyourday.org 

Posted in Culture, Guest Blogs, Student Health & Wellness 

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